Mercenary Mondays: Defining Schlock

Ooof.

What a weekend. Captain America: The Winter Soldier came out. It rocked. Launched a new campaign with my “once a month on Friday group”. We settled on Iron Kingdoms. You can expect a write-up about that shortly, but I suppose that’s not why you’re here is it.

You wanna here me talk about the Schlock RPG.

Alright, alright. I’ll get to it.

When you set out to make anything new, roleplaying game, film, story, anything, you need to have a plan of attack. A idea of where you’re going. When making a new RPG, we need to decide what direction and goals the game needs to have.

There’s a lot of options. Some games just provide frameworks of rules (Dungeons and Dragons, GURPS, etc.) These rules are designed to be used in whatever setting, story or style of play you want. Their feel is up to the players. Other games, especially licensed games, have a very specific set of goals. A Song of Ice and Fire RPG is a very different animal then a generic fantasy framework. A Star Wars RPG has a very different tone then a Firefly RPG and the rules are often times constructed around that conceit.

So, in approaching Schlock, we really have to narrow down what makes Schlock unique among scifi, and how that should define our rules/approach to the game.

So, I sat down, and reread Schlock from the very start to (at the time) the current point in the story, which was 2/3 of the way through the Broken Wind storyarc. Here is what I took from my reread of the Schlockiverse.

1.) Schlock is grounded. Bear with me as I explain my thinking through this. Schlock is grounded in it’s characters and their struggles. Any RPG of Schlock needs compelling characters for it.

2.) Schlock is hard-(ish) sci fi. Unlike Star Trek or even Star Wars, Schlock takes it’s internal science very seriously and is very grounded in real science. I used the “-ish” above because I am not an astrophysicist and I don’t always know.

3.) Schlock is violent. Whoa…major characters die regularly in Schlock, and they rarely get to come back. Alright, so character death needs to be a real concern, but we also need to include the advanced science stuff.

4.) Funny. Schlock is funny (clearly, it’s a comedy after-all). Whew, funny is always hard to translate into RPGs. However, Schlock’s comedy is more dry humor then slap-stick. (We’ll come back to this in a full post on it’s own. It deserves it.).

5.) It’s about a group of people. This is different. Schlock very much thrives on the idea that this is a company of soldiers working together, and any game based on Schlock will need to grab that feeling and tone.

 


 

Alright, so that’s core to the Schlock RPG. It needs to be hard grounded SciFi that’s driven around characters. Easy enough from a design perspective, but then the rule set needs to fit with the idea of complications, good storytelling, and fun.

But the thing that make Schlock unique above all else, is being in a mercenary company. So, the biggest focus in Schlock is that your character, isn’t the most important thing to the game. That’d be the mercenary company you work for. Because that’s who pays you to be a trigger-jockey.

So how do we approach such a thing? Well, first off, making your merc company is an integral part of character creation, and  the company gets it’s own character sheet. It defines a lot, and your characters are somewhat defined by the roles they fulfill for the mercenary company.

Your character does not level in this game so much as your mercenary character levels and gains more benefits to impart to your characters. With the advent of soldier-boosts, cybernetics, and more, sophont potential has pretty much been capped or rendered effectively moot. Your character does improve, but it’s not via experience points. Experience is spent to gain more advantages for your charter.

So far, it’s been a lot of fun, and the focus on the group mechanics of the charter have allowed us to mitigate some of the difficult parts of many roleplaying games. New character integration, splitting the party and more, becomes rolled into the charter rules and usage.

It really is an exciting new game to play, and I can not wait to get a chance to show you all!

 

 

4 thoughts on “Mercenary Mondays: Defining Schlock”

  1. Meaning no disrespect: This sounds a bit like what _BattleTech_’s had done to it in the past few years — as units gain experience, they are permitted to “break the rules” in some small but important respect (a bonus to Initiative; improved to-hit at a given range, or in a certain environment; etc.) This leads me to wonder if I will be able to improve my unit in a manner which suits my play style and personality (think “Sgt. Schlock, end of Book 9″).

    1. No disrespect taken. I definitely see where you’re coming from, and I can see the similarities. All I’ll say right now, is that next week, I’ll post a more through explanation of the Charters and how they work. It’s not quite the way you’re thinking no.

  2. I like the way you think! One of the things that struck me about Tagon’s Toughs is that all the main and many of the secondary characters all have a tremendous amount of honor when it comes to working with, and sometimes dying for, the company. Even Schlock, bless his pillaging little, um, heart, looks to the company to provide for his wants. Or at least when he helps himself to something, it’s (mostly) within the company’s policies.

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